John Romero Unleashes Unseen Doom Development Art For 21st Anniversary

Young John Romero, along with the ID Software gang.

Young John Romero, along with the ID Software gang.

 

This past Thursday (December 11, 2014), John Romero made a post on Twitter about this day marking the 21 year anniversary of the seminal release of Doom. This was the first person shooter that not only solidified the genre, but also permeated the industry and influenced it for the years to come. The impact that this game had and its commercial success is nigh impossible for anyone to deny, even today.

 

A never before seen digital scan of the Archvile model striking an intimidating pose.

A never before seen digital scan of the Archvile model striking an intimidating pose.

 

Romero’s post also linked to a zipped folder on a file sharing website that contains a collection of previously unseen development art that never made it into the final release of Doom. For those who fancy themselves to be video game historians in a certain capacity, this may not be such a surprise from the outset. Doom underwent many changes and even led to one of the core ID Software team members (Tom Hall) leaving due to the game’s dark nature and graphic violence.

 

This image depicts four images, one of which looks like a pile of corpses arranged in a way that makes it look like some sort of sick and twisted shrine.

This image depicts four images, one of which looks like a pile of corpses arranged in a way that makes it look like some sort of sick and twisted shrine.

 

Doom went from being a story driven squad based first person with an interesting “helmet HUD” system to being what it is now. That, of course, is of no discredit to this milestone in video game history. With that, a few images show further evidence of the existence of different looking weapons, enemies, environment textures, sprite animations and other such development artworks.

 

This graphic show the beginnings of the disembodied flying skull enemies known in the Doom Bestiary as Lost Souls.

This graphic show the beginnings of the disembodied flying skull enemies known in the Doom Bestiary as Lost Souls.

 

However, the majority of this art never even made it into any of the prototypes of Doom. It is very possible to see, if you are familiar with this subject, how these images fall into the creative through line of progression of this historic game’s development cycle. At long last, avid gamers and fans can get an even closer look into the fascinating history of this title and the history of one of the industry’s most storied development companies.

 

 

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Proto Watch: Resident Evil [8-4-1995 Alpha] (PS)

Welcome to a brand new Solid State Gamer original video series called Solid State Gamer Proto Watch. In this series, Jon Rivera (Lead Reviewer, Host of the Romcast, Solid State Gamer) plays through video game prototypes and reveals how these builds play similarly or differently from their commercial release counterparts. In this first installment of SSG Proto Watch Jon takes an in depth look at the Aug 4, 1995 prototype of Resident Evil for the Sony Playstation. The initial ingredients of the resurrected survival horror formula are there, but there also exist differences and features that do not appear in final version. Check it out and see this prototype in motion!

 

 

As always, Thanks for watching! If you enjoyed this edition of SSG Proto Watch be sure to rate and subscribe to our channel for more video features. If you have any comments or suggestions for future video features, drop us a line at:

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