Game Review: Journey to Silius (NES)

Journey To Silius NA Box Art

Journey To Silius NA Box Art

 

Name: Journey to Silius
Developer: Sunsoft
Publisher: Sunsoft
System: Nintendo Entertainment System
Genre: Run and gun 2D side scrolling platformer
Release Date: September, 1990

 

(Editor’s Note: This review was done playing a US copy of Journey To Silius to completion on a North American Nintendo Entertainment System, both being purchased by the reviewer.)

 

Journey to Silius is very interesting, yet obscure run and gun game. Developed and published by Sunsoft, the game falls into an odd space graphically, musically, and mechanically. This title focuses mostly on shooting and traversing the environment through jumping from one platform to the next in a ‘stage to stage’ structure. However, it does not function at all like its peers in the genre.

In Journey to Silius you play the role of Jay McCray. The year is 0373 of the space faring era. Jay’s father, a prestigious scientist, is working on a project to develop and create a space colony within the Silius Solar System (SSS). Unfortunately, he and the rest of his research team are killed in a nuclear explosion that completely obliterates the entire station. Jay is told that his father’s death was simply a freak accident. However, after searching through his father’s room at home, Jay finds a floppy disk with a text file explaining that terrorists had been planning an attempt on his father’s life to stifle the creation of the space colony. Jay decides to follow in his father’s footsteps to develop the space colony, but not until he makes his way to Silius in order to find these terrorists and kill them, thus avenging his father’s murder.

The story is very disjointed and some areas of it are ambiguous, but not in a way that makes it seem like it was intentional. As a result, there’s a bit of disconnect between the narrative and the core game play of Journey to Silius. Also, there is only one cut scene which explains this and there are no other scenes that carry the story along throughout the game, so there is no real character or story development. This would not be necessary in normal cases, but this game made the start and does not have any follow through. In the end, the game’s story is pretty weak.

However, the other aspects of Journey to Silius are most likely to make you overlook this one shortcoming. The shooting portion of this title is solid as it takes a cue from other Nintendo Entertainment System games like Bionic Commando and Rolling Thunder. There is no aiming upward or in diagonal directions. This could normally cripple a run and gun game made after the game Contra, but each of the stages in Journey to Silius is designed to cater to Jay’s shooting capacity. Another aspect of this game that makes the shooting more accessible is the inclusion of an inventory where Jay can access any guns he finds after killing enemies. Jay starts out with a simple hand gun and a shotgun, but can eventually acquire weapons like a laser cannon and grenade launcher. All the other special weapons have and share a limited amount of ammunition as where the hand gun has unlimited ammunition. Some of these weapons will make some sections of certain stages much easier to get past without taking on damage.

One interesting thing to point out about the enemies in Journey to Silius is that most of them are environmental hazards like distant missile silos, ceiling and floors mounted laser cannons, land mines, flame throwers, motion sensitive spear contraptions, and so on; not necessarily just sentient enemies. There are sentient enemies that range from slow to fast and some are armed and this combination both sentient and level centric dangers combines to make a great challenge for gamers who seek to test the mettle of their game playing prowess. Another core aspect of Journey to Silius is the platform game play. This is the very thing that requires getting used to, as it does not function like any other game of the genre that uses a jumping mechanic. Jay is able to run, crouch and go prone, and jump to the right and left. The surprising aspect about the jumping physics is that while in the air you have little control over Jay, which is much more realistic than other games that came out around this time. Also, if Jay runs off an edge he will fall in a diagonal direction rather than falling straight downward, again going with the grain of realistic movement.

With increased realism in movement comes increased difficulty. With that, Journey to Silius has a significantly steep learning curve. This is not for anyone who is not willing to unlearn movement and jumping mechanics of other popular platformers like Mario and Mega Man. Most first time players will find themselves falling on top of enemies and hazards that they were inherently trying to avoid. Another part about the jumping in the game is whether or not you are in the middle of a jump, getting injured will make Jay shunt backward. If you were in the middle of jumping over a bottomless pit and get injured in the process, chances are you will be met with instantaneous death. Journey to Silius’ difficulty is substantial, but it is not cruel; it is just unforgiving. The controls in this game are solid and responsive for the most part. The only weird part about the game in terms of control is that while changing direction or going into a prone position you cannot jump. However, this is just a small issue and can again be chalked up it being because of this game’s theme of mechanical realism.

The graphics in Journey to Silius are fantastic and exceed the watermark left by other games that have come out during the same year. Everything from character sprites to the stage environments to the bosses that takes one half to the whole screen, the artwork crammed into this 2 Mbit cartridge meets the current standard at the time. Jay’s animations have three frames at the very least with ducking, but can range up to five frames when he turns from left to right and vice versa. Each action stage is more unique than the last with one of them having some automatic scrolling action. You will not see the same enemies from one stage in the next, so there is not a lot of rehash when comes to the level design making the experience fresh.

The high point of Journey to Silius has to be well made and exhilarating musical score. The music of this game is quite possibly the best you will ever find on a Nintendo Entertainment System title or any 8-Bit platform from both a technical and entertainment perspective. Journey to Silius is one of the few games of the time that has actual base tones in the music. Sunsoft uses this sound technology to create the most heart-pumping and dynamic soundtrack that will provoke and convince you to press forward through the frantic action of shooting mechanized enemies while trying to traverse the tricky pit and hazard riddled level environments. Actually, the music in this game is more bound to drive you to play it from start to finish than the story the game tries to have. Though the soundtrack is absolutely phenomenal, there is a bit of rehash with the music. The first stage’s music is also recycled for the final stage. However, the overall quality of each of the tracks sort of makes this a moot point.

One thing that cannot be overlooked in terms of the audio in Journey to Silius is the sound effects. Nearly all of the sounds in it are recycled from previous games developed by Sunsoft. They are not altered or improved in any way to complement the soundtrack in any sense. This aspect, like the story telling, gives off the impression that no one involved made any attempt at making the effects original. Another issue is that most off the sounds are so low in in volume that they are drowned out by the bass heavy music featured in Journey to Silius.

There are a couple of minor issues that may rub some gamers the wrong way. To start, if Jay is in the middle of a ducking or turning animation, pressing the ‘A’ button to jump will yield no response. Another quirk in Journey to Silius has to do with health and ammunition power-ups. The inclusion of both can hypothetically aid you in the game. Unfortunately, these pickups (specifically the health) are so woefully seldom that you will probably forget that these power-ups even exist. Though this is the case this goes along with the overall difficulty of this title.

With that being said, Journey to Silius is an unforgettable experience. Despite a few kinks in this game it stands well with its immense difficulty. With its breakneck and frantic shooting and side scrolling action, challenging platform game play, a robust arsenal of weapons, and an absolutely phenomenal soundtrack Journey to Silius is bound to delight both the hardcore and the general game enthusiast and will make a great addition to anyone’s NES library. No one should go without experiencing this undeniably classic game.

 

Rating V-V

Solid State Romcast: The 10-20-14 show

On this Romcast, the boys talk some Time Splitters Rewind and explain why this is such a significant franchise that deserves to live on. After that Jon, Matt and Durrty delve deeper into the controversial Postal-esque shooter called Hatred and why Epic Games has requested that the developer take the Unreal name off its new game play trailer. Lastly, the guys head down to Awesome Inc. and talk to some of the folks (Matt, Tim and Tom) from the indie game development group Run, Jump Dev and ask about what exactly the group is about and what they do. Check it out!!

 

Solid State Romcast 10-20-14 Show

 

Be sure to drop us a line at our E-mail address: solidstateromcast@gmail.com. As always, thanks for listening and stayed tuned for the next installment!

 

Solid State Romcast Crew:

Jon “San Juan” Rivera – Host

Matt “Off” White – Cohost

Richard “Durrty” Hunt – Eastern Connection

 

Music Credit:

Introduction Theme – Car Jack [2011 version] by Electric Children

Interlude No. 1 – Unknown Track A by ???

Interlude No. 2 – Unknown Track B by ???

Roundtable Theme – Pumped by RoccoW

Resolution Theme – Skip Sandwich DX By Electric Children

Solid State Romcast: The 10-13-14 Show

Here on this latest Romcast, the three blokes address issues with the length and randomness of segments and preemptively apologize for potentially offending folks. This is an ongoing evolving beast for all of us involved, so please bare with us and keep in mind that this is not just meant to be informative, but is also a fun and casual meeting of the minds who make up the Solid State Gamer crew, so do not try to take things too seriously.

Anywho, the three celebros give an update on the Gamergate fiasco and talk about the organized assault on gamers as a demographic making absurd accusations of misogyny and being a hate group.

In other news, Jon, Matt and Durrty talk about a new crowd funded game called Human resourcesl a real time srategy game that takes influences from the mecha and lovecraftian mythos. This is a game being developed by industry veterans and has a great looking comic book style.

Lastly, The guys vent their frustrations of playing horrible games that may have been great ideas on paper, but have been renowned for being unmitigated catastrophes. Resident evil 6, Duke Nukem, Superman 64 and so on. This is the last epic Romcast, so enjoy while it lasts!!

 

Solid State Romcast 10-13-14 Show

Be sure to drop us a line at our E-mail address: solidstateromcast@gmail.com. As always, thanks for listening and stayed tuned for the next installment!

 

 

Solid State Romcast Crew:

Jon “San Juan” Rivera – Host

Matt “Off” White – Cohost

Richard “Durrty” Hunt – Eastern Connection

 

Music Credit:

Introduction Theme – Car Jack [2011 version] by Electric Children

Interlude No. 1 – Unknown Track A by ???

Interlude No. 2 – Unknown Track B by ???

Roundtable Theme – Pumped by RoccoW

Resolution Theme – Skip Sandwich DX By Electric Children

Konami Reveals Brazilian Announcers For Pro Evolution Soccer 2015

240px-Konami.svg

Earlier on the 9th of October, Konami has announced that the two legendary Brazilian soccer announcers Mauro Beting and Silvio Luiz for its upcoming game Pro Evolution Soccer 2015. This prefaced the other announcement of a new trailer for this title that has since been published on Youtube, which shows some of the best club teams from Brazil. This trailer debut occurred in Booth No.1 at the Brazil Game Show convention held in São Paolo from Oct. 9 – 12.

Pro Evolution Soccer 2015 Front Box Art.

Pro Evolution Soccer 2015 Front Box Art.

“PES captures the realism of soccer like no other video game on the market, and we continue to do this through signature elements like the legendary Brazilian commentary team for Portuguese PES players throughout the world. With our latest trailer, we’re giving Brazilian console game players, and those throughout the rest of the world, another reason to celebrate the incredible experience.”

~Tomohiro Uesugi, President of Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc

 

This is not the first time that Konami has enlisted the soccer expertise of Beting and Luiz. They both have been important assets to the Portugese localization of the Pro Evolution Soccer franchise since 2011. Beting has been in the radio broadcast scene as well as being a sports journalist covering soccer for years and has even written a few books. Luiz is also well known for his presence on both television and radio critiquing and commentating on the sport.

Konami has allegedly turned to the mechanics that govern the player’s control over the action when on field and has completely reworked them. This is being done in an effort to further finely tune the game play control and bring the PES franchise back to the central focus of responsive,  intuitive controls that made the first game a commercial and critical success back in 2001

Pro Evolution Soccer 2015 will also feature famous soccer commentators from many other various regions in various supported languages. However, Konami has yet to divulge anymore information concerning this. Pro Evolution Soccer 2015 is slated for a November 13, 2014 release worldwide just in time for the big holiday season, and will retail at $59.99 MSRP for both the PS4 and Xbox One. Ports made for the PS3, Xbox 360 and PC will sold at the price of $39.99 MSRP.

Game Review: Wipeout [wipE’out”] (PS, SAT, PC)

Wipeout Sega Saturn US Cover Art

Wipeout Sega Saturn US Cover Art

Name: Wipeout (wipE’out”)
Developer: Psygnosis (Designers Republic)
Publisher: Psygnosis, Soft Bank (Saturn Version)
System: PS, SAT, PC
Genre: Racing
Release Date: September 29, 1995 (PS & PC version), 1996 (SAT version)

 

(Editor’s Note: This game was covered using official copies of Wipeout and was played on a stock North American Sega Saturn and Sony Playstation consoles both owned by the reviewer. The PC version was played using the latest version of DOSBox.)

 

The racing game genre has seen many entries with most being conventional takes on modern automotive sports. There have some interesting directions taken with games like F-Zero (SNES) and Locus (PC). Wipeout is another such game that takes the racing game genre in a different direction, but also throws many established elements to make it a fresh game. The mix of anti-gravity racing physics, varying levels of challenge, a fantastic techno soundtrack, and combat mechanics makes Wipeout a great amalgamation of various concepts from other classic racing games.

This game’s fiction takes place in the mid twenty first century where the ballistic anti-gravity racing sport has become immensely popular. This sport is global and has competitors from all over the globe as well as companies and the teams that these pilots belong to. The story is here as a backdrop for the universe of Wipeout, but is not terribly important. The core focus of this title is the racing game play.

With the main single player mode dubbed “Championship Race” you will race through various tracks in a specific rotation. In order to progress to the next track the player must rank at least in the top three spots. Failure to do so takes one of the three lives the player starts off with until there are exhausted which results in a game over.

The style of play in Wipeout is easily traced to F-Zero with the anti-gravity racing physics, but it is very different with how it controls. The way the crafts fly down the track is much looser then it’s Super Nintendo forbearer. The emphasis on anticipating sharp turns is much greater and demands an understanding of how to drift and fish tail through turns with varying degrees of sharpness. However, this is only part of the formula that Wipeout is composed of. While this makes for a tougher racing experience, there is a great sense of fluidity and freedom to the movement while playing.  There are some issues with the physics in the game. Touching edges of the track and other crafts will bring your craft to a complete stop no matter how fast you are speeding. When crashing head on this makes perfect sense, but even lightly grazing surfaces will have the same effect. This will become a constant annoyance and will confuse you when other crafts controlled by the computer do not react the same way.

The other aspect of this game is the race class the player chooses of which there are two; Venom and Rapier. Venom is the standard class and sets the top speeds to a certain maximum value. With Rapier Class all these maximums are increased substantially forcing the player adjust and adapt to these conditions. Another aspect that keeps this game fresh is the ballistic combat. Each track has a slew of roadway markings which take the form of weapon and acceleration icons. This is very much like Megarace (PC) in a sense, but there are no negatively affecting road markings. Speeding over a weapon icon will give you a randomly chosen weapon or tool. These weapons include shields, boosts, mines, missiles, and so on. Each has its own specific purpose and requires the player to create strategies on the fly while trying to rank in each race. This is makes every race a challenge because this element is far less predictable than track and craft choices. Unfortunately, this element is also slightly flawed. The computer crafts will only target your craft. They do not directly attack other computer controlled crafts unless it is a weapon that affects an area of track.

Each F3600 Racing League team has two pilots as well as its own specially designed crafts varying in aspects like handling, top speed, acceleration, and so on. While the pilot choice is inconsequential the team choice will affect how you control your craft on the race track. On top on these craft choices, every track is made up of various materials which also affect how crafts handle on them. This will force you to alter your tactics for each track in terms of where to speed up and how early to anticipate turns in the track.

The aesthetic graphics are absolutely fantastic and really push the hardware of both console versions of Wipeout. The draw distance is pretty large and makes it easy to see twists and turns in the track well in advance; an issue that some early 3D racing games have had in the past. The attention to detail with the crafts and track environments is truly impressive. All these elements give off a great far flung futuristic vibe. This is bolstered even higher with the licensed soundtrack made up of techno songs contributed by various artists. These tracks have a fast-paced rhythm that go perfectly with the sense of speed achieved when racing along various race ways.

There are some significant differences between the three versions of Wipeout. While the PC and Playstation versions were made first, the Sega Saturn version is a port. The PC version has a draw distance limitation compared to the two console versions, but the load times for tracks are shorter that than the Playstation version. Considering these differences along with the fact that the PC version doe not support multiplayer, the PS1 and PC versions do still have close similarities. However, the Saturn is a very different matter. The Playstation version has a two player head-to-head mode made possible by using the link cable to connect two consoles with two copies of the game. The Saturn port does not have this feature, nor does it have a split screen mode. While this seems a bit crippling, it is fair to note that, aside from the particle effects with weapons, this port has the sharpest visuals. The textures do not warp and distort at certain vantage points like in both the PC and PS1 versions. It also has shorter load times.  Also, there are a couple of exclusive music tracks added to the soundtrack of the Saturn port. If multiplayer is a must for you then the PC version is recommended. The PS1 version has multiplayer, but using it requires a link cable, two consoles, two copies of the game, and two TVs. The barrier to entry is simply too much. If you simply want experience this game, the Saturn would be the best choice because it looks great if you can overlook the lack of plasma effects.

Despite some minor yet annoying issues, Wipeout is certainly an entertaining ride.  The anti-gravity physics make for a great sense of fluidity and freedom and the various choice driven elements make it a challenge of constant adjustment and adaptation. The combat allows for some interesting quick strategy and the aesthetic style makes for a unique atmosphere not often seen in games of the genre. It is unconventional, but if you are fan of racing games have a taste for a new take on racing mechanics and physics then Wipeout is a refreshing experience worth your time.

 

Rating IV-V

Solid State Romcast: The 10-6-14 Show

On this Romcast Mr. Off White shares an update to the Gamer Gate scandal involving Intel pulling their advertising from Gamasutra. A sucker punch for sure. The crew then talks about how Assassin’s Creed Unity will not be running at 1080p or 60fps. Surprising?? The Romcast crew sure doesn’t! Lastly, the ragtag trio open up Pandora’s box that is the subject of gaming peripherals and how they have evolved over the years while talking about specialty controllers… What have they done!? Check it out!!

 


Solid State Romcast – 10-6-14 Show

 

Be sure to drop us a line at our E-mail address: solidstateromcast@gmail.com. As always, thanks for listening and stayed tuned for the next installment!

 

Solid State Romcast Crew:

Jon “San Juan” Rivera – Host

Matt “Off” White – Cohost

Richard “Durrty” Hunt – Eastern Connection

 

Music Credit:

Introduction Theme – Car Jack [2011 version] by Electric Children

Interlude No. 1 – Unknown Track A by ???

Interlude No. 2 – Unknown Track B by ???

Roundtable Theme – Pumped by RoccoW

Resolution Theme – Skip Sandwich DX By Electric Children

Accessory Review: Action Replay 4M Plus Cartridge (SAT)

The Action 4M Plus Cartridge

The Action 4M Plus Cartridge

Name: Action Replay 4M Plus
Manufacturer: Datel
Platform: Sega Saturn
Release Date: 1997

 

(Editor’s Note: This accessory was covered using it on a North American Sega Saturn console.)

 

For a large number of gamers in the community who have played a great deal of games for a particular system, the importing of games from other distribution territories has grown into its own area of interest or obsession. There are a few reasons why import games have captured the attention of many in the gaming community. This hobby is one that has been around since the mid 1990’s and has not stopped since.

Some individuals import foreign versions of games they already have in their domestic collections. The reasoning behind this is that some titles, when they are localized for domestic audiences, sometimes suffer from content censorship or have alterations made to the overall mechanics and difficulty. One example of this the differences between the US and Japanese versions of Final Fantasy 4 and 6. Not only was the numbering of these titles incorrect, but changes were also made to censor both games’  uses of religious iconography and references to  Christianity. There are also numerous translation snafus in that mix. Another great example is the first Resident Evil or Biohazard as it is known in Japan. The intro cinematic is heavily censored along with other sequences in Resident Evil, even though the game is rated M.

Wipeout 2097 Saturn Cover Art

Wipeout 2097 Saturn Cover Art

Another reason has to do with ports of titles that may not have seen a domestic release. An instance of this occurring is the game Wipeout XL (a.k.a. Wipeout 2097 in Europe). Anyone remotely familiar with this franchise has at least heard of this game and knows it was a Playstation exclusive. However, this is only true in the US. We Americans were only able to play this on Sony’s 32-bit console, as where the Japanese and Europeans also had a version of Wipeout 2097/XL on the Sega Saturn. People who have played it claim it is in some ways better than the native Playstation version.

The biggest reason to import is to discover games that have only seen release in the respective territory in which they were developed. This mostly applies to Japanese only titles and European only games to a lesser extant. This issue is very pervasive with the Sega Saturn. The Saturn only has so many games in its US domestic library, but the Japanese library has many more titles under its belt. The Mobile Suit Gundam Blue Destiny trilogy, Deep Fear (Sega’s answer to Resident Evil 2), Princess Crown (the spiritual predecessor to Odin Sphere for the PS2) and Treasure’s Radiant Silvergun are just a few Japan only games that come to mind. There also exists a few Japan only fighting games that are known for their arcade perfect translation and overall polish.

 

Sega Saturn Modcip

Sega Saturn Modchip

 

There do exist ways to modify a system for playing import games and either requiring the physical modification of the console itself or just the use of software to bypass the region lockout code of the Saturn’s BIOS. There is also a way to play import titles that require propping the CD tray open and quickly, physically swapping a domestic game disc with an import one to get it to work.

This disc swapping method is not recommended for two reasons. Because this particular method requires keeping the tray open coupled with being in intimate proximity of the CD reading mechanism, potential damage to the reading lens can easily result. It is also a good way to potentially crack or chip your game disc from clumsy handling; this method requires a lot of dexterity. Even preforming the disc swap trick properly is not healthy for the CD reading machine because it puts unwarranted stress on it; not something you want to do for a nearly twenty year old device.

This is why one of the two most viable options includes the use of a modification chip. This chip is mounted to the section of the Saturn’s main board that is supposed to connect directly to the CD reading mechanism. This chip has a ribbon slot that completes a daisy chain between the main board and the reading machine. While this method does work well, it does also require  you to solder hot and cold wires to selects contact points directly on the power supply connection junction, which means that this mod is permanent. For someone who grew up with his or her Saturn and does not wish to physically alter the machine there is a great alternative.

Enter Action Replay, a series of cartridge based accessories that are intended to circumvent the regional lockout protection of various consoles. There have been three different versions made for the Sega Saturn, but the one we are going to focus on is the Action Replay 4M Plus. Unlike previous Sega Saturn revisions, this cartridge has four key features combined into one incredible accessory.

This Action Replay unit serves as a memory storage device for saving, deleting and transferring game save files to and from the system’s internal storage memory. This is very useful for users who have a Saturn that has a dead internal battery. Even with a fully functional machine, the internal memory only holds so many game saves. Being able to copy saves over to the Action Replay for future use is a godsend.

Another key feature is the main reason to own this accessory. This unit allow anyone to play Saturn titles from any region. The best part about this feature is that it is simply a software modification and does not require permanently altering your machine and potentially running the risk of bricking it.

The Action Replay 4M Plus also serves as a RAM expansion cartridge that is something required for select titles that require more memory to run at full graphics settings. This is mostly applicable to those Capcom fighting games that have near arcade perfect translations. With other previous revisions of Action Replay this was not possible because the region lockout feature already took up the only cartridge slot on the system.

Lastly, this device allows you to input cheat codes in order to modify or enhance your gaming experience. Tinkering with the cheat code feature can also allow players to access assets and other features on the game disc that may not have made it into the final release and is simple dead code on the disc. Doing this can sometimes render the game unplayable or prone to crashing, so caution is strongly advised.

The Action Replay 4M Plus is such a feature packed accessory and is a great all-in-one device that serves as the ultimate gateway into a side of the Sega Saturn that most players may not have seen before. It was definitely the case for us at the Solid State Gamer. Being able to play exclusives like Deep Fear (Sega’s answer to Resident Evil 2) was great along with playing all three Gundam Side Story Blue Destiny Games with the Saturn Twin Stick being a dream come true! However, there are so many more interesting Japan and Europe only games for the system. If you want to enter a whole new world of gaming possibilities with your Sega Saturn then the Action Replay 4M Plus is a must own.

 

 

Rating V-V

Solid State Romcast: The 9-30-14 Show

The Romcast is back with delay thanks to Mazda. The gang talks some destiny once more, delving into the story and content or lack there of. After that, they bust into the announcement trailer and general details surrounding the spiritual successor to the Wipeout anti gravity racing series called Formula Fusion (originally referred to as Slamjet Racing). Lastly, the entourage comes together to talk about funding and distribution models for video games, past present and future. Don’t miss it!!

 

Solid State Romcast 9-30-14 Show

 

Be sure to drop us a line at our E-mail address: solidstateromcast@gmail.com. As always, thanks for listening and stayed tuned for the next installment!

 
Solid State Romcast Crew:

Jon “San Juan” Rivera – Host

Matt “Off” White – Cohost

Richard “Durrty” Hunt – Eastern Connection

 

Music Credit:

Introduction Theme – Car Jack [2011 version] by Electric Children

Interlude No. 1 – Unknown Track A by ???

Interlude No. 2 – Unknown Track B by ???

Roundtable Theme – Pumped by RoccoW

Resolution Theme – Skip Sandwich DX By Electric Children